Social Media Apps to Watch Out For

  • TikTok: short form video app that allows users to create and share short videos
  • Hoop: mobile app that connects with Snapchat to allow users to find new friends
  • Instagram: photo and video sharing platform
  • Snapchat: photo and video sharing app that allows photos to show for a brief period
  • Byte: video sharing app similar to Vine or TikTok
  • YOLO: anonymous question and answer app
  • Yubo: location based live streaming app
  • WhatsApp: cross-platform messaging; allows users to send text messages and voice messages, make voice and video calls, and share images, documents, user locations, and other media
  • Chatous: instant messaging app
  • GroupMe: private chat room for small groups
  • ASKfm: app that allows users ask questions to any person with the choice of being anonymous or as an identified user
  • Whisper: it’s a form of ‘anonymous social media’, allowing users to post and share photo and video messages anonymously
  • Blendr: video chat room where you are encouraged to “chat, flirt, and meet” with other users in your immediate area
  • TamTam: chat and video messenger app
  • Wink: mobile app that allows users to meet new friends on Snapchat via swiping
  • Twitch: video live streaming service
  • Discord: voice, video, and text chat app for teens age 13 and up
  • Kik: instant messenger app
  • Viber: messenger app with video and voice calls
  • Telegram: cloud-based instant messenging and voice-call app
  • Likee: video creation and sharing platform

How to Keep kids safe on social media

  • Monitor use of the internet; consider keeping computer or electronics in the same common room.
  • Talk to kids about why it is important not to disclose personal information online.
  • Check your child’s profile and what they post.
  • Read and follow safety tips provided by these apps or websites.
  • Report inappropriate activity to the website or law enforcement immediately.
  • Explain to your children that once images are posted online, they can never be taken back.
  • Only allow kids to post photos or personal identifying information on websites with your knowledge and consent.
  • Instruct kids to use privacy settings and to restrict access to profiles.
  • Remind kids to only add people they know in real life to contact lists.
  • Encourage kids to choose appropriate screen names and nicknames.
  • Talk to your kids about creating strong passwords.
  • Visit social networking websites with your kids and exchange ideas about acceptable versus potentially risky websites. 
  • Make it a rule that your kids can never give out personal information or meet anyone in person without your prior consent and knowledge. 
  • Encourage kids to consider whether a message is harmful, dangerous, or rude before posting or sending it online.
  • Teach kids not to respond to any rude or harassing remarks or messages that make them feel scared, uncomfortable, or confused (have them show you the messages instead)
  • Educate yourself on the websites, apps, and software that your child uses. 

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